IN CONVERSATION WITH THELMA CHAMBERS

Interview with Esther Boehm

HOW DID YOUR JOURNEY AS AN ARTIST START?
I used to draw and paint as a child, my father bought me painting by numbers and although I found the images very strange with their patches of paint, I loved the process and the little pots of colour; I also loved magic painting books though I longed for them to have stronger colours. Throughout my childhood, I was enchanted by illustrations from children’s books, (especially fairy tales and Mabel Lucie Atwell drawings ) and comics.

Groundbreaking Sculpture

Fisheater, Lynn Chadwick, 1951

Figure Totem Beast: Sculpture in Britain in the 1950s is the name of a current exhibition at Tate Britain. It is noteworthy because the sculptures were made in the time after the Second World War where a growing optimism of a more humane society was contrasted with the fears of nuclear development in the Cold War. These opposing elements are explored through pieces in isolation, with couples or in groups. The pieces are dynamic and full of energy.

The Legacy of Kettle’s Yard

1. House extension, downstairs Showing Italo Valenti’s collages (1964) and Lucie Rie’s bowl ‘The Wave’ (1971)

Looking at the origins of Kettle’s Yard in 1957, it is hard to imagine the legacy it has become. Although Jim Ede would have preferred a stately home, he was offered 4 tiny condemned slum dwellings from the president of the Cambridge Preservation Society.